teachingliteracy:

(by sullen_snowflakes)
Let us look for secret things
somewhere in the world
on the blue shores of silence.
— Pablo Neruda, from On the Blue Shores of Silence: Poems of the Sea (Rayo, 2004)

(Source: tumbleword)

 
 sinkling:

notebooks by tiny happy on Flickr.

sinkling:

notebooks by tiny happy on Flickr.

 spietatamemoria:

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 teachingliteracy:

(by aggray)
All of Dostoevsky’s heroes question themselves as to the meaning of life. In this they are modern: they do not fear ridicule. What distinguishes modern sensibility from classical sensibility is that the latter thrives on moral programs and the former on metaphysical programs. In Dostoevsky’s novels the question is propounded with such intensity that it can only invite extreme solutions. Existence is illusory or it is eternal. If Dostoevsky were satisfied with this inquiry, he would be a philosopher. But he illustrates the consequences that such intellectual pastimes may have in a man’s life, and in this regard he is an artist.
— Albert Camus The Myth of Sisyphus (via bratya-karamazovy)
 
Like a snake, my heart
has shed its skin.
I hold it here in my hand,
full of honey and wounds.
— Federico Garcia Lorca, New Heart  (via bbook)

(Source: saloandseverine)

 vintageanchorbooks:

“Do not be afraid; our fateCannot be taken from us; it is a gift.”

vintageanchorbooks:

“Do not be afraid; our fate
Cannot be taken from us; it is a gift.”

Much like fairy tales, there are two facets of horror. One is pro-institution, which is the most reprehensible type of fairy tale: Don’t wander into the woods, and always obey your parents. The other type of fairy tale is completely anarchic and anti-establishment.
— Guillermo del Toro on how horror is inherently political as a genre, Time Magazine (x)

(Source: cerulean-spork)

 

(Source: bookporn)

 rosettabooks:

How to block out the world on a stressful day.

rosettabooks:

How to block out the world on a stressful day.

isskra:

The Blampied Edition of Peter and Wendy" 1940.
Edmund Blampied 1886-1966 
Edmund Blampied was one of the most eminent artists to come from the Channel Islands, yet he received no formal training in art until he was 16 years old. He was noted mostly for his etchings and drypoints, published at the height of the print boom in the 1920s, but was also a lithographer, caricaturist, cartoonist, book illustrator and artist in oils, watercolours, silhouettes and bronze.

As a child I felt myself to be alone, and I am still, because I know things and must hint at things which others apparently know nothing of, and for the most part do not want to know. Loneliness does not come from having no people about one, but from being unable to communicate the things that seem important to oneself, or from holding certain views which others find inadmissible.
— Carl Gustav Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections (via liquidnight)