fenrirsfangs:

April Book Photo Challenge: Spring (Apr. 03)
A Dance with Dragons by George R.R. Martin
“Winter is coming, Jon reflected. And soon, too soon. He wondered if they would ever see a spring.”

fenrirsfangs:

April Book Photo Challenge: Spring (Apr. 03)

  • A Dance with Dragons by George R.R. Martin

Winter is coming, Jon reflected. And soon, too soon. He wondered if they would ever see a spring.”

 bibliolectors:

Very enjoyable read … vacation / Lectura muy placentera… vacaciones (ilustración de Robert Wagt)

bibliolectors:

Very enjoyable read vacation / Lectura muy placentera… vacaciones (ilustración de Robert Wagt)

 aseaofquotes:

Nick Hornby, About a Boy

aseaofquotes:

Nick Hornby, About a Boy

earhat:

History Meme. 4/6 Women → Virginia Woolf, 1882-1941

Woolf was an English writer, and one of the foremost modernists of the twentieth century.

During the interwar period, Woolf was a significant figure in London literary society and a central figure in the influential Bloomsbury Group of intellectuals. Her most famous works include the novels Mrs Dalloway (1925), To the Lighthouse (1927) and Orlando (1928), and the book-length essay A Room of One’s Own (1929), with its famous dictum, “A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.” Woolf suffered from severe bouts of mental illness throughout her life, thought to have been the result of what is now termed bipolar disorder, and committed suicide by drowning in 1941 at the age of 59.  [+more]

 nonconcept:

Breathtaking designed bookshelves.
Check my next article on Hashslush. Like, share and give some feedback please. Thank you. Riccardo

nonconcept:

Breathtaking designed bookshelves.

Check my next article on Hashslush. Like, share and give some feedback please. Thank you. Riccardo

greatpiraticalrumbustification:

June Book Photo Challenge: Day 26 - Travel

Austrian National Library, Vienna, Austria

Trinity College Library, Dublin, Ireland

Atlantis Books, Oia, Santorini, Greece

Some of the bookish places I’ve been on my travels.

When we think of horror stories as being primarily about lone, male protagonists facing “evil” that must be defeated, it makes sense that certain writers might feel left out of the paradigm. Of course, horror has never been that simple. What better genre is there for turning conventions about gender, good and evil, sexuality, and society on their head than the genre that asks us to look at the darkest parts of ourselves? Women, as well as people of color and others who are culturally marginalized, have stories to tell that can transform and subvert existing horror conventions. Horror has subverted expectations about “monstrous” and “normal” or “evil” and “good” right from the beginning of the genre, and now compelling and diverse dark fiction writers are reaching more readers and expanding definitions of horror.
— from Horror and The Women Who Write It by Letitia Trent (via bookriot)

vintageanchorbooks:

Today is Alice Munro's birthday! 

Alice Munro grew up in Wingham, Ontario, and attended the University of Western Ontario. She has published fourteen collections of stories as well as a novel, Lives of Girls and Women. During her distinguished career she has been the recipient of many awards and prizes, including the 2013 Nobel Prize for Literature. 

“A story is not like a road to follow … it’s more like a house. You go inside and stay there for a while, wandering back and forth and settling where you like and discovering how the room and corridors relate to each other, how the world outside is altered by being viewed from these windows. And you, the visitor, the reader, are altered as well by being in this enclosed space, whether it is ample and easy or full of crooked turns, or sparsely or opulently furnished. You can go back again and again, and the house, the story, always contains more than you saw the last time. It also has a sturdy sense of itself of being built out of its own necessity, not just to shelter or beguile you.” 

Books connect us with others, but that connection is created in solitude, one reader in one chair hearing one writer, what John Irving refers to as one genius speaking to another.
— Lewis Buzbee, The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop (via beckisbookshelf)

junkoy:

"Tsukuru Tazaki" book covers in different countries 

(Source: haruki-murakami.com)

 

(Source: mixandchic.com)

 likeafieldmouse:

King Minos’s Labyrinth
"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos. 
Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull. 
Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.
Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus's creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur. 
After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.
In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

likeafieldmouse:

King Minos’s Labyrinth

"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos.

Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull.

Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.

Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus's creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur.

After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.

In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

 outofprintclothing:

Happy Birthday, Alice Munro!
Commenting on winning the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature.

outofprintclothing:

Happy Birthday, Alice Munro!

Commenting on winning the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature.

 explore-blog:

Nobel Prize in Literature winner Alice Munro (b. July 10, 1931) on what makes a great story

explore-blog:

Nobel Prize in Literature winner Alice Munro (b. July 10, 1931) on what makes a great story

 theparisreview:

Happy birthday, Alice Munro! Read her 1994 Art of Fiction interview.
Portrait: Andreas Vartdal

theparisreview:

Happy birthday, Alice Munro! Read her 1994 Art of Fiction interview.

Portrait: Andreas Vartdal