slnnn:

Huhhh, sonunda kavuştuk! :) #tolstoy #levtolstoy #henritroyat #books

slnnn:

Huhhh, sonunda kavuştuk! :) #tolstoy #levtolstoy #henritroyat #books

If you spend enough time reading or writing, you find a voice, but you also find certain tastes. You find certain writers who when they write, it makes your own brain voice like a tuning fork, and you just resonate with them. And when that happens, reading those writers … becomes a source of unbelievable joy. It’s like eating candy for the soul.

And I sometimes have a hard time understanding how people who don’t have that in their lives make it through the day.

— David Foster Wallace (via forcingit)

ejmellowbookends:

Gorgeous photography by Anka Zhuravleva

I try more and more to be myself, caring relatively little whether people approve or disapprove.
— Vincent van Gogh (via girlinlondon)

(Source: onlinecounsellingcollege)

vintageanchorbooks:

"A story is not like a road to follow… it’s more like a house. You go inside and stay there for a while, wandering back and forth and settling where you like and discovering how the room and corridors relate to each other, how the world outside is altered by being viewed from these windows. And you, the visitor, the reader, are altered as well by being in this enclosed space, whether it is ample and easy or full of crooked turns, or sparsely or opulently furnished. You can go back again and again, and the house, the story, always contains more than you saw the last time. It also has a sturdy sense of itself of being built out of its own necessity, not just to shelter or beguile you." 
— Alice Munro

 okuma-gunlugum:

ebookfriendly:

Adam Stanley says http://ebks.to/1nZsOSB

hahaha
 vintage23elfride:

untitled by nicolasv on Flickr.

exulansis

dictionaryofobscuresorrows:

n. the tendency to give up trying to talk about an experience because people are unable to relate to it—whether through envy or pity or simple foreignness—which allows it to drift away from the rest of your life story, until the memory itself feels out of place, almost mythical, wandering restlessly in the fog, no longer even looking for a place to land.

 vintageanchorbooks:

On this month’s The New Yorker fiction podcast, Nathan Englander reads John Cheever’s short story “The Enormous Radio,” which first appeared in The New Yorker in 1947.
Listen here: http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/fiction-podcast-nathan-englander-reads-john-cheever

vintageanchorbooks:

On this month’s The New Yorker fiction podcast, Nathan Englander reads John Cheever’s short story “The Enormous Radio,” which first appeared in The New Yorker in 1947.

Listen here: http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/fiction-podcast-nathan-englander-reads-john-cheever

So what did Amalfitano’s students learn? They learned to recite aloud. They memorized the two or three poems that they loved most in order to remember them and recite them at the proper times: funerals, weddings, moments of solitude. They learned that a book was a labyrinth and a desert. That there was nothing more important than ceaseless reading and traveling, perhaps one and the same thing. That when books were read, writers were released from the souls of stones, which is where they went to live after they died, and they moved into the souls of readers as if into a soft prison cell, a cell that later swelled to burst. That all writing systems are frauds. That true poetry resides between the abyss and misfortune and that the grand highway of selfless acts, of the elegance of eyes and the fate of Marcabru, passes near its abode. That the main lesson of literature was courage, a rare courage like a stone well in the middle of a lake district, like a whirlwind and a mirror. That reading wasn’t more comfortable than writing. That by reading one learned to question and remember. That memory was love.
— Robert Bolano, Woes of the True Policeman  (via honeyforthehomeless)
 teachingliteracy:

(by annaalyn)
 
A bookshop in Hay-on-Wye, the literary town of Wales, which is world renown for used books. This shop is housed in a converted church. (Photo credit: maisiewilliams)

A bookshop in Hay-on-Wye, the literary town of Wales, which is world renown for used books. This shop is housed in a converted church. (Photo credit: maisiewilliams)

(Source: mabelchiltern)

If only he could be alone in his room working, he thought, among his books. That was where he felt at his ease.
— Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse (via wavingtovirginia)

(Source: talesofpassingtime)

 jennwitte:

Tenth of December: Stories, George Saunders
I wear a bracelet of a peacock feather to remind me of Flannery. To remind me that it is okay to write controversial things, to have faith but still question it, to embrace the grotesque and shocking and ugly. She churned out writing, even in ill health, which I think of when I just don’t feel like putting pen to paper.