(by anne mumford)
 Ten Good Books About Love (by juliettetang)

Ten Good Books About Love (by juliettetang)

We’re so engaged in doing things to achieve purposes of outer value that we forget that the inner value, the rapture that is associated with being alive, is what it’s all about.

Joseph Campbell (via rowenaslove)

True enough.

(via wordpainting)

 brazilwonders:

Real Gabinete Português de Leitura - Rio de Janeiro (by Vera Golosova)

brazilwonders:

Real Gabinete Português de Leitura - Rio de Janeiro (by Vera Golosova)

All stories are about wolves. All worth repeating, that is. Anything else is sentimental drivel…. Think about it. There’s escaping from the wolves, fighting the wolves, capturing the wolves, taming the wolves. Being thrown to the wolves, or throwing others to the wolves so the wolves will eat them instead of you. Running with the wolf pack. Turning into a wolf. Best of all, turning into the head wolf. No other decent stories exist.
— Margaret Atwood, The Blind Assassin (via etalks)

bibliolectors:

Living with reading / Viviendo con la lectura (ilustración de Đậu Đũa)

 
John Keats, Endymion

John Keats, Endymion

(Source: sebastian-flyte)

 simena:

Ludwig Valenta

simena:

Ludwig Valenta

 simena:

Robert Sarsony

simena:

Robert Sarsony

 nathanielemmett:

Jodi Harvey-Brown's book sculpture of The Night Circus.

nathanielemmett:

Jodi Harvey-Brown's book sculpture of The Night Circus.

 vintageanchorbooks:

“The book was published in the early seventies and it has been banned so much and so many places. That I am told I am number 14 on the list of 100 banned books… I resent it. I mean if it’s Texas or North Carolina as it has been in all sorts of states. But to be a girl from Ohio, writing about Ohio having been born in Lorain, Ohio. And actually relating as an Ohio person, to have the Ohio, what- Board of Education? Is ironic at the least,” Morrison, a Lorain native, told the TV station.— Toni Morrison comments on the Ohio Board of Education President Request to Remove THE BLUEST EYE from State Common Core Materials

vintageanchorbooks:

“The book was published in the early seventies and it has been banned so much and so many places. That I am told I am number 14 on the list of 100 banned books… I resent it. I mean if it’s Texas or North Carolina as it has been in all sorts of states. But to be a girl from Ohio, writing about Ohio having been born in Lorain, Ohio. And actually relating as an Ohio person, to have the Ohio, what- Board of Education? Is ironic at the least,” Morrison, a Lorain native, told the TV station.
— Toni Morrison comments on the Ohio Board of Education President Request to Remove THE BLUEST EYE from State Common Core Materials

 vintageanchorbooks:


“She wasn’t ready to settle down, she told her friends. That was one way of putting it. Another was would have been that she had not found anyone to settle down with. There had been several men in her life, but they hadn’t been convincing. They’d been somewhat like her table - quickly acquired, brightened up a little, but temporary. The time for that kind of thing was running out, however. She was tired of renting.”  ― Margaret Atwood, Moral Disorder: and Other Stories Margaret Atwood’s collection of short stories follows the life of a single character, seen as a girl growing up the 1930s, a young woman in the 50s and 60s, and, in the present day, half of a couple, no longer young, reflecting on the new state of the world. Each story focuses on the ways relationships transform a character’s life: a woman’s complex love for a married man, the grief upon the death of parents and the joy with the birth of children, the realization of what growing old with someone you love really means. By turns funny, lyrical, incisive, earthy, shocking, and deeply personal, Moral Disorder displays Atwood’s celebrated storytelling gifts and unmistakable style to their best advantage.

vintageanchorbooks:

“She wasn’t ready to settle down, she told her friends. That was one way of putting it. Another was would have been that she had not found anyone to settle down with. There had been several men in her life, but they hadn’t been convincing. They’d been somewhat like her table - quickly acquired, brightened up a little, but temporary. The time for that kind of thing was running out, however. She was tired of renting.”
Margaret Atwood, Moral Disorder: and Other Stories

Margaret Atwood’s collection of short stories follows the life of a single character, seen as a girl growing up the 1930s, a young woman in the 50s and 60s, and, in the present day, half of a couple, no longer young, reflecting on the new state of the world. Each story focuses on the ways relationships transform a character’s life: a woman’s complex love for a married man, the grief upon the death of parents and the joy with the birth of children, the realization of what growing old with someone you love really means. By turns funny, lyrical, incisive, earthy, shocking, and deeply personal, Moral Disorder displays Atwood’s celebrated storytelling gifts and unmistakable style to their best advantage.

 isilluminating:

September Book Photo Challenge9. Favourite Cover - I love the Penguin English Library editions

isilluminating:

September Book Photo Challenge
9. Favourite Cover - I love the Penguin English Library editions

 simena:

Clara Louise Bell

simena:

Clara Louise Bell

Always be on the lookout for the presence of wonder.
E. B. White  (via apoetreflects)

(Source: crashinglybeautiful)