Really I don’t like human nature unless all candied over with art.
Virginia Woolf  (via thelostdeer)

(Source: goodreads.com)

misswendyd:

Gorgeous Puffin in Bloom editions illustrated by Anna Bond from Rifle Paper Company! Beautiful artwork on those endpapers and cover, plus special bonus materials at the end of each book. Including, of course, a recipe for raspberry cordial.

We’re giving away a complete set of four to one lucky person who completes our MG/YA classics challenge this year!

Photographs by The Midnight Garden.

Women have always been healers. They were the unlicensed doctors and anatomists of Western history. They were abortionists, nurses, and counselors. They were pharmacists, cultivating healing herbs and exchanging secrets of their uses. They were midwives, travelling from home to home and village to village. For centuries women were doctors without degrees, barred from books and lectures, learning from each other, and passing on experience from neighbor to neighbor and mother to daughter. They were called “wise women” by the people, witches or charlatans by the authorities. Medicine is part of our heritage as women, our history, our birthright.
Witches Midwives and Nurses: A History of Women Healers - Barbara Ehrenreich & Deirdre English (via mangoestho)

(Source: studentmotherlife)

 oykudefteri:

Le Herisson

For instance: which came first, man or venereal disease? I suppose hosts always have to precede their parasites, but is that really true? Maybe man was invented by viruses, to give them a convenient place to live.

Margaret Atwood, Life Before Man

(via defense-mechanisms)

 birazsoylebirazboyle1:

Kasım 2013

birazsoylebirazboyle1:

Kasım 2013

That old September feeling, left over from school days, of summer passing, vacation nearly done, obligations gathering, books and football in the air … Another fall, another turned page: there was something of jubilee in that annual autumnal beginning, as if last year’s mistakes had been wiped clean by summer.
— Wallace Stegner (via raquellereyes)

(Source: delta-breezes)

 books0977:

Bookplate. Urling Sibley. Frances W. (Fanny) Delehanty (American, 1879-1977).
Delehanty studied at Pratt Institute and had one woman shows in New York City.  In later years, circa 1940s, she lived in Bethlehem Connecticut with Lauren Ford (1891-1973), another artist. She spent some years in France, served as a nurse in World War I, and after World War II she and Miss Ford brought nuns from Solesmes to Bethlehem where they started the present Benedictine Abbey of Regina Laudis.

books0977:

Bookplate. Urling Sibley. Frances W. (Fanny) Delehanty (American, 1879-1977).

Delehanty studied at Pratt Institute and had one woman shows in New York City.  In later years, circa 1940s, she lived in Bethlehem Connecticut with Lauren Ford (1891-1973), another artist. She spent some years in France, served as a nurse in World War I, and after World War II she and Miss Ford brought nuns from Solesmes to Bethlehem where they started the present Benedictine Abbey of Regina Laudis.

 aseaofquotes:

Azar Nafisi, Reading Lolita in Tehran

aseaofquotes:

Azar Nafisi, Reading Lolita in Tehran

Louisa May Alcott wrote Little Women for the money. And it made her miserable.

As a young writer, Alcott concentrated on lurid pulp stories of revenge, murder, and adultery–“blood and thunder” literature, as she called i–and enjoyed writing very much. She was in her mid 30s when an editor suggested she try writing a book for girls. Alcott wasn’t very interested, but her father was a complete moron with money and had left the family in terrible financial trouble. Alcott wrote Little Women in hopes of some decent sales and a little breathing room and got way more than she asked for. The money in sequels was too good to turn down (and her father didn’t get any smarter with a dime), but Alcott hated writing what she called “moral pap for the young” and longed to return to the smut and violence of her early endeavors.
 ejmellowbookends:









“Books are humanity in print.” by Julia Dávila-Lampe 

ejmellowbookends:

“Books are humanity in print.” by  
Learn to love solitude, to be more alone with yourselves. The tragedy of today’s young people is that they try to unite on the basis of carrying out noisy and aggressive actions so as not to feel lonely, and this is a sad thing. The individual must learn from childhood to be on his own, for this doesn’t mean to be lonely: it means to not get bored with oneself, because a person who finds himself bored when he is alone, it seems to me, is a person in danger.
— Andrei Tarkovsky on being asked, ‘What would you like to tell young people? (via creatingaquietmind)

(Source: funeral-wreaths)

 curef0rpain:

magus books. waiting. by ordinary.days on Flickr.
 books0977:

Betty Boop reading while eating pickles. BB art by Patti S.
Boop was inspired by the singer Helen Kane, the ‘Boop Oop a Doop Girl.’ The character was originally created as an anthropomorphic French poodle. Max Fleischer finalized Betty Boop as a human character in 1932, in the cartoon Any Rags.

books0977:

Betty Boop reading while eating pickles. BB art by Patti S.

Boop was inspired by the singer Helen Kane, the ‘Boop Oop a Doop Girl.’ The character was originally created as an anthropomorphic French poodle. Max Fleischer finalized Betty Boop as a human character in 1932, in the cartoon Any Rags.

 

(Source: amandaonwriting)