Woolf often conceives of life this way: as a gift that you’ve been given, which you must hold onto and treasure but never open. Opening it would dispel the atmosphere, ruin the radiance—and the radiance of life is what makes it worth living. It’s hard to say just what holding onto life without looking at it might mean; that’s one of the puzzles of her books. But it has something to do with preserving life’s mystery; with leaving certain things undescribed, unspecified, and unknown; with savoring certain emotions, such as curiosity, surprise, desire, and anticipation. It depends on an intensified sense of life’s preciousness and fragility, and on a Heisenberg-like notion that, when it comes to our most abstract and spiritual intuitions, looking too closely changes what we feel. It has to do, in other words, with a kind of inner privacy, by means of which you shield yourself not just from others’ prying eyes, but from your own. Call it an artist’s sense of privacy.

Joshua Rothman's New Yorker essay on Virginia Woolf’s idea of privacy is the best thing I’ve read in ages. 

It rings especially poignant in the context of her own conflicted inner life, from her exuberant appreciation of the world’s beauty to her intense capacity for love to the deathly despair of her suicide letter.

Do yourself a favor and read Rothman’s full essay here.

(via explore-blog)

(Source: explore-blog)

 umla:

(via Pin by sea-angels by lynn barron on Vintage Country | Pinterest)
 booksndmovies:

Cloud Atlas - Tom Tykwer, Andy Wachowski & Lana Wachowski | Robert Frobisher reading The Pacific Journal of Adam Ewing

booksndmovies:

Cloud Atlas - Tom Tykwer, Andy Wachowski & Lana Wachowski | Robert Frobisher reading The Pacific Journal of Adam Ewing

 booksandhotchocolate:

"A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies, the man who never reads lives one."
- George R.R. Martin, A Dance With Dragons

booksandhotchocolate:

"A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies, the man who never reads lives one."

- George R.R. Martin, A Dance With Dragons

 olgachik:

Lady reading Richard Edward Miller

olgachik:

Lady reading
Richard Edward Miller

 
Books are lighthouses erected in the great sea of time.
— Edwin Percy Whipple (via bibliophilebunny)
 books0977:

The Hound of the Baskervilles, Another Adventure of Sherlock Holmes. A. Conan Doyle. Illustrations by Sidney Paget. London: George Newnes, Limited, 1902. First edition.
“Mr. Sherlock Holmes, who was usually very late in the mornings, save upon those not infrequent occasions when he stayed up all night, was seated at the breakfast table…”

books0977:

The Hound of the Baskervilles, Another Adventure of Sherlock Holmes. A. Conan Doyle. Illustrations by Sidney Paget. London: George Newnes, Limited, 1902. First edition.

“Mr. Sherlock Holmes, who was usually very late in the mornings, save upon those not infrequent occasions when he stayed up all night, was seated at the breakfast table…”

 renardiere:

Antonio Cerra

renardiere:

Antonio Cerra

 
 fariedesign:

Loneliness is almost cured when you open a book.
More artworks: fariedesign

fariedesign:

Loneliness is almost cured when you open a book.

More artworks: fariedesign

 beautiful-bibliophile:

So I heard these are good books? #books #fantasy #GOT #booknerd #bookstagram #bookworm #gameofthrones #bibliophile #instabook #author #awesome

beautiful-bibliophile:

So I heard these are good books? #books #fantasy #GOT #booknerd #bookstagram #bookworm #gameofthrones #bibliophile #instabook #author #awesome

There must be something innate about maps, about this one specific way of picturing our world and our relation to it, that charms us, calls to us, won’t let us look anywhere else in the room if there’s a map on the wall.
Ken Jennings  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: emotional-algebra)

 kafkaesque-world: