krystin731:

Book 9 Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides
About gender and sexual identification, incest and immigration, love and hope. Its a book I think everyone needs to read

krystin731:

Book 9
Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides

About gender and sexual identification, incest and immigration, love and hope.
Its a book I think everyone needs to read

28 Brilliant Works Of Literary Graffiti →

 endlesslibraries:

Caius College Library (by x)

endlesslibraries:

Caius College Library (by x)

A scrupulous writer, in every sentence that he writes, will ask himself at least four questions, thus: 1. What am I trying to say? 2. What words will express it? 3. What image or idiom will make it clearer? 4. Is this image fresh enough to have an effect?
— George Orwell; Politics and the English Language (via wordpainting)

ohhreader:

Book Challenge - Day 02: A book that you’ve read more than 3 times

also what i am currently reading

 teachingliteracy:

via etsy.
 michaelfaudet:

Strawberries by Michael Faudet

michaelfaudet:

Strawberries by Michael Faudet

aformofhealing:

Voltaire and Rousseau 
12-14 Otago Ln, Glasgow, Lanarkshire G12 8PB, United Kingdom

 aseaofquotes:

Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses

aseaofquotes:

Ian Rankin, Knots and Crosses

professorfangirl:

Ben Whishaw reading “Annabel Lee” by Edgar Allan Poe. I’ve never heard the strange, tender, spooky heart of it quite so clearly.

(My audio edit from the Poetica podcast, “Tides.”)

 grett:

untitled by Elif Araf Yalım on Flickr.
When I first began to read Virginia Woolf’s novels, I felt she wrote like a sculptor. She was able with words to build forms, strip away surfaces, shed representation in a way different from abstraction. […] Her articulation of the mental landscape when the brain turns within is the peak of her genius and her courage. Sometimes chrysalis, some- times only to “wish for death” (Virginia’s diary), she articulates the extremes. No writer gave more of her life force to the exploration of the world beyond the surfaces.
 lemieletlalune:

Pretty much sums up my life. (Thanks for the tote @cindyloughridge and @erikheywood!)

lemieletlalune:

Pretty much sums up my life. (Thanks for the tote @cindyloughridge and @erikheywood!)

Isolation offered its own form of companionship: the reliable silence of her rooms, the steadfast tranquility of the evenings. The promise that she would find things where she put them, that there would be no interruption, no surprise. It greeted her at the end of each day and lay still with her at night.
— Jhumpa Lahiri, The Lowland (via bookmania)
 teachingliteracy:

tea party (by manyfires)

teachingliteracy:

tea party (by manyfires)