wavingtovirginia:

Two proof copies of The Years, Virginia Woolf, 1937. 

“I wonder if anyone has ever suffered so much from a book as I have from The Years. Once out I will never look at it again. It’s like a long childbirth. Think of that summer, every morning a headache, and forcing myself into that room in my nightgown; and lying down after a page: and always with the certainty of failure. Now that certainty is mercifully removed to some extent. But now I feel I don’t care what anyone says so long as I’m rid of it. And for some reason I feel I’m respected and liked. But this is only the haze dance of illusion, always changing. Never write a long book again. Yet I feel I shall write more fiction—scenes will form.”
— Virginia Woolf, from a diary entry dated 10 November 1936.

wavingtovirginia:

Two proof copies of The Years, Virginia Woolf, 1937. 

I wonder if anyone has ever suffered so much from a book as I have from The Years. Once out I will never look at it again. It’s like a long childbirth. Think of that summer, every morning a headache, and forcing myself into that room in my nightgown; and lying down after a page: and always with the certainty of failure. Now that certainty is mercifully removed to some extent. But now I feel I don’t care what anyone says so long as I’m rid of it. And for some reason I feel I’m respected and liked. But this is only the haze dance of illusion, always changing. Never write a long book again. Yet I feel I shall write more fiction—scenes will form.”

— Virginia Woolf, from a diary entry dated 10 November 1936.

 reading-as-breathing:

 Sol Undurraga
The first duty of the novelist is to entertain. It is a moral duty. People who read your books are sick, sad, traveling, in the hospital waiting room while someone is dying. Books are written by the alone for the alone.
— Donna Tartt, author of The Secret History (via vintageanchorbooks)

Hi i was wondering if you had any recommendations for books for a book club that AREN'T super sad and depressing - I can't take the heartache anymore ! haha thanks so much!! :) (from swagtasticelastic)

I have noticed when I saw your question that all the books about book clubs and booklovers I have read and I know are sad and gloomy. So I am not sure what I can recommend you. Any help folks?

 (by KaiaPieters)
 (by Duygu Öksünlü)

prettybooks:

gettyimagesarchive:

Today is the 17th World Book Day the day to celebrate all things bound and book-like. Whether as a relaxing or ripping read or an aid to improve posture today is the day you simply can’t beat a book.

Happy World Book Day!

Thinking is my fighting.
— Virginia Woolf, in her essay Thoughts on Peace in an Air Raid, dated 15 May 1940 (via fleurstains)

(Source: sangfroidwoolf)

proofreadingbooks:

The literature: Stephen King’s DOCTOR SLEEP

The libation: Danny Torrance stopped drinking, but you may need something to help you drift off after reading this. Brew a mug of chamomile tea, let steep for 3 minutes, add 1 tbsp honey and 3 oz. absinthe, stir, and sip.

Sweet dreams.

Poster © MCAD

You are like night, calmed, constellated.Your silence is star-like, as distant, as true.
— Pablo Neruda, I Like You Calm, As If You Were Absent  (via light-essence)

(Source: violentwavesofemotion)

youngadultatbooktopia:

"Reading is probably another way of being in a place."
- José Saramago

proofreadingbooks:

The literature: Orhan Pamuk’s ISTANBUL: MEMORIES AND THE CITY

The libation: Your humble sommelier took a little break this week to sit by the Bosphorus and drink çay and visit The Museum of Innocence, and she brought Orhan Pamuk to keep her company. If you can’t make the trip right now, you can recreate the experience by curling up with ISTANBUL and a cup of authentic Turkish tea.

You’ll need a çaydanlık (a Turkish double teapot) and a set of thin-waisted Turkish tea glasses. Fill the bottom kettle of the çaydanlık with two liters of water and bring to a boil. While you’re waiting, put 1/3 cup rinsed black tea leaves in the upper kettle and place it on top of the bottom kettle. Once the water is boiling, pour half of it into the upper kettle. Reduce the heat to medium and let the tea steep over the steam from the bottom kettle.
Fill a glass to the waist with tea and then top off with the hot water from the bottom kettle to dilute. Serve on a delicate, exquisitely painted saucer with sugar cubes on the side. Sip, and be transported.

Photo © alainawaagner

Only the gentle are ever really strong.
— James Dean (via pureblyss)

http://bookriot.tumblr.com/post/78788764983/books-books-books-i-had-found-the-secret-of-a →

bookriot:

Books, books, books!
I had found the secret of a garret room
Piled high with cases in my father’s name;
Piled high, packed large,—where, creeping in and out
Among the giant fossils of my past,
Like some small nimble mouse between the ribs
Of a mastodon, I nibbled here and there
At this or that box, pulling through the gap,
In heats of terror, haste, victorious joy,
The first book first. And how I felt it beat
Under my pillow, in the morning’s dark,
An hour before the sun would let me read!
My books!

Elizabeth Barrett Browning, “Aurora Leigh”

 

(Source: amandaonwriting)