theparisreview:

“Do you know why teachers use me? Because I speak in tongues. I write metaphors. Every one of my stories is a metaphor you can remember. The great religions are all metaphor. We appreciate things like Daniel and the lion’s den, and the Tower of Babel. People remember these metaphors because they are so vivid you can’t get free of them and that’s what kids like in school. They read about rocket ships and encounters in space, tales of dinosaurs. All my life I’ve been running through the fields and picking up bright objects. I turn one over and say, Yeah, there’s a story.” —Ray Bradbury, born on this day in 1920

theparisreview:

“Do you know why teachers use me? Because I speak in tongues. I write metaphors. Every one of my stories is a metaphor you can remember. The great religions are all metaphor. We appreciate things like Daniel and the lion’s den, and the Tower of Babel. People remember these metaphors because they are so vivid you can’t get free of them and that’s what kids like in school. They read about rocket ships and encounters in space, tales of dinosaurs. All my life I’ve been running through the fields and picking up bright objects. I turn one over and say, Yeah, there’s a story.” —Ray Bradbury, born on this day in 1920

scholasticreadingclub:

nationalbook:

Words only book lovers truly understand.

This is the truth!

 wordpainting:

My latest coffee mug purchase. Banned Books Coffee Mug. 

wordpainting:

My latest coffee mug purchase. Banned Books Coffee Mug

 twentysomethingvagabond:

prettybookish:

isilluminating:

Italo Calvino

I want to read Calvino but I want to learn Italian first :/

Ooh buona fortuna. I can read a little italian but Calvino baffles me. He’s beautiful in English as well! 

twentysomethingvagabond:

prettybookish:

isilluminating:

Italo Calvino

I want to read Calvino but I want to learn Italian first :/

Ooh buona fortuna. I can read a little italian but Calvino baffles me. He’s beautiful in English as well! 

 theparisreview:

“People often ask me why I chose to narrate a novel from the point of view of an intersex person, and my answer is, every novel should be narrated by an intersex person. The job of the novelist is to inhabit both male and female characters, so in a sense every novelist should possess a hermaphroditic imagination.” —Jeffrey Eugenides

theparisreview:

“People often ask me why I chose to narrate a novel from the point of view of an intersex person, and my answer is, every novel should be narrated by an intersex person. The job of the novelist is to inhabit both male and female characters, so in a sense every novelist should possess a hermaphroditic imagination.” —Jeffrey Eugenides

 balkon sefası (by hamaratkedi)

balkon sefası (by hamaratkedi)

macrolit:

Great Expectations, Charles Dickens

 
Great Comfort book sculpture by Malena Valcarcel

Great Comfort book sculpture by Malena Valcarcel

(Source: bookporn)

 alanimohammed:

mohammed alani 2010

alanimohammed:

mohammed alani 2010

 

(Source: word-stuck)

macrolit:

The Stranger, Albert Camus

She ran the back of her hand along the first shelf, listening to the shuffle of her fingernails gliding across the spinal chord of each book. It sounded like an instrument, or the notes of running feet.
— Markus Zusak, The Book Thief (via thebooker)
 distantheartbeats:

Currently, in the Tate Modern.

distantheartbeats:

Currently, in the Tate Modern.

sigvardnilsson:

Book Design by Lili Koves (i forget how to do the little dots over the o)