booksandotherdrugs:

December Challenge Day 8: Happily Ever After
Stardust, Neil Gaiman

booksandotherdrugs:

December Challenge Day 8: Happily Ever After

Stardust, Neil Gaiman

I think we are worlds compressed into human form.
Jeanette Winterson, The Daylight Gate (via splitterherzen)
 stilllifequickheart:

Annika Connor
Library 2
21st century

stilllifequickheart:

Annika Connor

Library 2

21st century

I wonder, what’s in a book while it’s closed. Oh, I know it’s full of letters printed on paper, but all the same, something must be happening, because as soon as I open it, there’s a whole story with people I don’t know yet and all kinds of adventures, deeds and battles. And sometimes there are storms at sea, or it takes you to strange cities and countries. All those things are somehow shut in a book. Of course you have to read it to find out. But it’s already there, that’s the funny thing. I just wish I knew how it could be.
— michael ende (via forevernyc)

(Source: hecantelliaintmissinnomeals)

 
She believed that books served as a mirror of the person who accumulated them.
— Donna Leon, Through A Glass, Darkly (via coffeebooksandfriends)

didyousaybooks:

I found some old illustrated french editions of classic stories…

Long dismissed as a less serious art form, graphic novels have finally started to gain more mainstream credibility over the last 20 years. There are many, many excellent graphic novels out there, but if you’re looking for a place to start, start here! 

25 Essential Graphic Novels

(Source: flavorpill)

 
paris. by mariell øyre on Flickr.

paris. by mariell øyre on Flickr.

Hold fast to dreams,
For if dreams die
Life is a broken-winged bird,
That cannot fly.
— Langston Hughes (via wordpainting)
 
When others asked the truth of me, I was convinced it was not the truth they wanted, but an illusion they could bear to live with.
Anaïs Nin (via creatingaquietmind)
 
endless list of books you should read ⤍ The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker

endless list of books you should read ⤍ The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker

But what shall I do when instead of a heart this fear is beating in my body?
— Franz Kafka, Letters to Milena (via kafkaesque-world)

There is a secret bond between slowness and memory, between speed and forgetting. Consider this utterly commonplace situation: a man is walking down the street. At a certain moment, he tries to recall something, but the recollection escapes him. Automatically he slows down. Meanwhile, a person who wants to forget a disagreeable
incident he has just lived through starts unconsciously to speed up his pace, as if he were trying to distance himself from a thing still too close to him in time.

In existential mathematics, that experience takes the form of two basic equations: the degree of slowness is directly proportion to the intensity of memory; the degree of speed is directly proportional to the intensity of forgetting.

Milan Kundera, from Slowness (HarperCollins, 1996)

(Source: liquidnight)