papertownbooks:

Many lives!

papertownbooks:

Many lives!

(Source: krissstrawberry)

 

(Source: paleeyesmusic)

 books0977:

Girl Reading. Isabel Codrington (British, 1874-1943). Oil on canvas.
Aspects of 18th-century dress design were revived and three-quarter sleeves, as in the present work, became fashionable. So too did lace-trimmed fichus, large ‘kerchiefs’ worn around the shoulders. Although restrained in its palette, there is a hint of radicalism in the discarded yellow-backed French novel lying on the floor. Codrington’s reader may be demure, but her tastes in literature are daring.

books0977:

Girl Reading. Isabel Codrington (British, 1874-1943). Oil on canvas.

Aspects of 18th-century dress design were revived and three-quarter sleeves, as in the present work, became fashionable. So too did lace-trimmed fichus, large ‘kerchiefs’ worn around the shoulders. Although restrained in its palette, there is a hint of radicalism in the discarded yellow-backed French novel lying on the floor. Codrington’s reader may be demure, but her tastes in literature are daring.

Two layouts of 221B Baker Street, published in the last issue of The Strand Magazine, March 1950.

(Source: silverstags)

 s-tuttered:

Student Dru Santiago’s, “Down & Out in Paris and London”, George Orwell-2 (by Letterologist)

s-tuttered:

Student Dru Santiago’s, “Down & Out in Paris and London”, George Orwell-2 (by Letterologist)

 theparisreview:

“Robots will neither be common nor very good in 2014, but they will be in existence.”
From 1964, Isaac Asimov’s predictions of what the world would look like—in 2014. (via)

theparisreview:

“Robots will neither be common nor very good in 2014, but they will be in existence.”

From 1964, Isaac Asimov’s predictions of what the world would look like—in 2014. (via)

Why did people ask “What is it about?” as if a novel had to be about only one thing.
— Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Americanah (via mar-see-ah)
 slnnn:

Tolkien 122 yaşında! #tolkien #birthday

slnnn:

Tolkien 122 yaşında! #tolkien #birthday

There is a secret bond between slowness and memory, between speed and forgetting. Consider this utterly commonplace situation: a man is walking down the street. At a certain moment, he tries to recall something, but the recollection escapes him. Automatically he slows down. Meanwhile, a person who wants to forget a disagreeable
incident he has just lived through starts unconsciously to speed up his pace, as if he were trying to distance himself from a thing still too close to him in time.

In existential mathematics, that experience takes the form of two basic equations: the degree of slowness is directly proportion to the intensity of memory; the degree of speed is directly proportional to the intensity of forgetting.

— Milan Kundera, Slowness (via liquidnight)
There are books that one reads over and over again, books that become part of the furniture of one’s mind and alter one’s whole attitude to life, books that one dips into but never reads through, books that one reads at a single sitting and forgets a week later.
Books v. Cigarettes, George Orwell (via readaroundtherosie)
 floralls:

but her time is still here (by Natalia Romanova)

floralls:

but her time is still here (by Natalia Romanova)

Just because one person’s problem is less traumatic than another’s doesn’t mean they’re required to hurt less.
— J.A. Redmerski, The Edge of Never  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: simply-quotes)

http://awritersruminations.tumblr.com/post/71872567312/to-work-deliberately-in-the-form-of-the-fragment →

awritersruminations:

To work deliberately in the form of the fragment can be seen as stopping or appearing to stop a work closer, in the process, to what Blanchot would call the origin of writing, the centre rather than the sphere. It may be seen as a formal integration, an integration into the form itself, of a question about the process of writing. It can be seen as a response to the philosophical problem of seeing the written thing replace the subject of the writing. If we catch only a little of our subject, or only badly, clumsily, incoherently, perhaps we have not destroyed it. We have written about it, written it and allowed it to live on at the same time, allowed it to live on in our ellipses, our silences.

— Lydia Davis, “Form as Response to Doubt” (via mttbll)

 myjetpack:

An Alphabet of Books
A drawing I have in this show.
Also, I have a new print for sale.

myjetpack:

An Alphabet of Books

A drawing I have in this show.

Also, I have a new print for sale.

any suggestions for books for my friends birthday, shes 16 and loves books like the city of bones series, the hunger games series and authors like john green? thanks :) (from theworldisconsumingme)

The Perks of Being a Wallflower, the Book Thief, The Curious Incident of the Dog… Also check noseinabook's list here.