orano:

Jacques Tardi - 1995 - In french comics magazine (A SUIVRE)

orano:

Jacques Tardi - 1995 - In french comics magazine (A SUIVRE)

Leave us alone without books and we shall be lost and in confusion at once.
— from “Notes from Underground” by Fyodor Dostoevsky (via clubdenni)
 
There are many reasons why novelists write, but they all have one thing in common - a need to create an alternative world.
— John Fowles
 bookslooks:

I’m always on the lookout for old books that look like these. 

bookslooks:

I’m always on the lookout for old books that look like these. 

 books0977:

Illustration of girl reading about Jonah by Dorothy P. Lathrop from Hitty - Her First Hundred Years by Rachel Field. The MacMillan Company, New York, 1929. First edition. Classic Tale of Phoebe Preble’s Doll. Newbery Award.
"There was a painful picture of a man being swallowed by a large fish."

books0977:

Illustration of girl reading about Jonah by Dorothy P. Lathrop from Hitty - Her First Hundred Years by Rachel Field. The MacMillan Company, New York, 1929. First edition. Classic Tale of Phoebe Preble’s Doll. Newbery Award.

"There was a painful picture of a man being swallowed by a large fish."

 vintageanchorbooks:

"It would be better for me … that multitudes of men should disagree with me rather than that I, being one, should be out of harmony with myself.’—Socrates, 482c, as reported by Plato in “Gorgias”

vintageanchorbooks:

"It would be better for me … that multitudes of men should disagree with me rather than that I, being one, should be out of harmony with myself.’
—Socrates, 482c, as reported by Plato in “Gorgias”

artmonia:

Book Art by  Thomas Allen.

 teachingliteracy:

Well Worn (by cathyhubmann)
 theparisreview:

This fall, Boston plans to erect an impressive new statue of Edgar Allan Poe: a raven at his side, a veiny heart tumbling from his “trunk full of ideas,” his coat billowing in the wind.
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

This fall, Boston plans to erect an impressive new statue of Edgar Allan Poe: a raven at his side, a veiny heart tumbling from his “trunk full of ideas,” his coat billowing in the wind.

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

 
Literature’s Most Unreliable Narrators

The multiple narrators of Mark Z. Danielewski’s novel present a trail of imaginary footnotes and conflicting information for us to sort through. Characters openly admit to their unreliability and mock us for trusting them. The tale isn’t just labyrinthine in content, but also in structure. Did you really expect to find a trustworthy source in a novel that looks like this?

Literature’s Most Unreliable Narrators

The multiple narrators of Mark Z. Danielewski’s novel present a trail of imaginary footnotes and conflicting information for us to sort through. Characters openly admit to their unreliability and mock us for trusting them. The tale isn’t just labyrinthine in content, but also in structure. Did you really expect to find a trustworthy source in a novel that looks like this?

(Source: alchemy)

 
Scattered through the ordinary world there are books and artifacts and perhaps people who are like doorways into impossible realms, of impossible and contradictory truth.
— Jorge Luis Borges (via tattoosandtravels)
 
untitled by ♥Rainnie.C♥ on Flickr.

untitled by ♥Rainnie.C♥ on Flickr.

(Source: schzimmydearr)

The daily routine of most adults is so heavy and artificial that we are closed off to much of the world. We have to do this in order to get our work done. I think one purpose of art is to get us out of those routines. When we hear music or poetry or stories, the world opens up again.
— Ursula LeGuin (via nathanielstuart)