vintageanchorbooks:

Short-story writer and poet Raymond Carver was born in Clatskanie, Oregon, a mill town on the Columbia River, on this day in 1938. “When you’re writing fiction or poetry… it really comes down to this: indifference to everything except what you’re doing… A young writer could do worse than follow the advice given in those lines.” — Raymond Carver (1938–1988)

vintageanchorbooks:

Short-story writer and poet Raymond Carver was born in Clatskanie, Oregon, a mill town on the Columbia River, on this day in 1938.

“When you’re writing fiction or poetry… it really comes down to this: indifference to everything except what you’re doing… A young writer could do worse than follow the advice given in those lines.”
— Raymond Carver (1938–1988)
 
Men are afraid that women will laugh at them. Women are afraid that men will kill them.
— Margaret Atwood (via misandry-mermaid)

(Source: wobblydash)

charlie-lewis:

I’m now selling a selection of my book covers as postcards!

Go to my brand new shop here: http://charlielewisillustration.bigcartel.com

 itsfrantastic:

Books of 2012: The Famished Road (Okri)
Thoughts in 10 words or less: Magical realism at its finest, post-colonial literature at its strongest.

itsfrantastic:

Books of 2012: The Famished Road (Okri)

Thoughts in 10 words or less: Magical realism at its finest, post-colonial literature at its strongest.

 my book, my good friend (by Tran Phuong Thanh)

my book, my good friend (by Tran Phuong Thanh)

http://nyphil.tumblr.com/post/44655246813/reading-into-bach-he-knew-he-shared-his →

nyphil:

Reading Into Bach

image

"He knew he shared his father’s love for Bach, but had only ever been interested in secular music. His Bach was the Bach of the Goldberg Variations, the Suites and Partitas, the Musical Offering, and the concertos. As a child he had gone with his parents to the St. Matthew Passion and the Christmas Oratorio and had been bored, which had led him to the belief that Bach’s religious music was not for him. If they hadn’t fit into the program for his trip with his father, he would never have thought of listening to the motets.

But when he was sitting in the church listening to the music, it took hold of him. He didn’t understand the texts, and because he didn’t want to distract himself from the music by reading the words, he didn’t follow along in the program, either. He wanted to savor the sweetness of the music. Sweetness was something he had never associated with Bach, nor in his view should it be. But what he was experiencing was sweetness, sometimes painful, sometimes soulful, profoundly at peace in the chorales. He remembered his father’s answer to his question about why he loved Bach.”


From “Johann Sebastian Bach on Ruegen,” part of the short-story collection Summer Lies by Bernhard Schlink (author of The Reader). Summer Lies comes out in paperback on Thursday, and The Bach Variations opens at Avery Fisher Hall, and features Bach’s Motet No. 1, tomorrow night.


(Photos: New York Philharmonic Digital Archives)

 vintageanchorbooks:

One of the three Murakami vending machines you can find at train stations in Poland.
Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage hits U.S. bookstores (not vending machines, sadly) on 8/12/14!

vintageanchorbooks:

One of the three Murakami vending machines you can find at train stations in Poland.

Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage hits U.S. bookstores (not vending machines, sadly) on 8/12/14!

 theparisreview:

Jane Austen read her own reviews, and took scrupulous notes: “Austen appears to have compiled the reactions of her readers from letters, hearsay, and direct conversations and recorded them on a set of closely written pages around 1815, before her death at the age of forty-one, two years later.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

Jane Austen read her own reviews, and took scrupulous notes: “Austen appears to have compiled the reactions of her readers from letters, hearsay, and direct conversations and recorded them on a set of closely written pages around 1815, before her death at the age of forty-one, two years later.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

 aseaofquotes:

Graham Greene, Orient Express

aseaofquotes:

Graham Greene, Orient Express

 tierradentro:

“Compartment C, Car 293”, 1938, Edward Hopper.

tierradentro:

Compartment C, Car 293”, 1938, Edward Hopper.

 weneeddiversebooks:

Victoria H. Smith ‏@VictoriaSmith76 
My reason why #WeNeedDiverseBooks - because I want to see my best friend in fiction. My sister. My brother. My classmates and co-workers. I want to see my community. Our Community.
I had a lover’s quarrel with the world.
— Robert Frost (via coffeebooksandfriends)
 vintageanchorbooks:

“When you come out of the storm, you won’t be the same person who walked in. That’s what this storm’s all about.” ― Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore
(Art source)

vintageanchorbooks:

“When you come out of the storm, you won’t be the same person who walked in. That’s what this storm’s all about.” 
― Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

(Art source)

 books0977:

Reading (exh. 1927). Henri Lebasque (French, 1865-1937). Oil on canvas. 
Lisa Banner makes light of the “characteristic mysterious aspect” in Lebasque’s work—“the absence of detail in his portrayal of faces.” She notes that the artist “achieves greater intimacy with his subjects by this technique, leaving them the anonymity of disguise by careful omission of facial distinction and coaxing greater expression from the limbs and body poses of his sitters”

books0977:

Reading (exh. 1927). Henri Lebasque (French, 1865-1937). Oil on canvas. 

Lisa Banner makes light of the “characteristic mysterious aspect” in Lebasque’s work—“the absence of detail in his portrayal of faces.” She notes that the artist “achieves greater intimacy with his subjects by this technique, leaving them the anonymity of disguise by careful omission of facial distinction and coaxing greater expression from the limbs and body poses of his sitters”